World War One to 1939
The stories of the ANZACs at Gallipoli, and the Australian Corps on the Western Front are well known, but the story of the ANZACs who fought in Sinai and Palestine is not....  
At the Pompey Elliott Memorial Hall Wednesday September 19, 2018 to a group of around 25....  
A remarkable logbook came to light in mid-2018, after 100 years in private hands....  
In this, the second in a two-volume series, Cameron tells the story of Australian troops on the Western Front from May to November 1918....  
Lambis Englezos is a Greek-born, retired Art Teacher from Melbourne, with a “magnificent obsession” to find, recover, and honour Australia’s missing diggers from the Battle of Fromelles – an obsession that grew from meeting many returned diggers as a child growing up in Melbourne....  
When the Allies launched an offensive in the Amiens sector on 8 August 1918, the outcome was far from assured; but in the next 100 days, success begat success until Germany agreed to the Armistice on 11 November. After the fact, this period became known as the ‘Hundred Days Offensive’....  
“You have to go along to get along” is a truth about large organisations which ‘Pompey’ Elliott understood well....  
This book is both fascinating and peculiar....  
The German Spring Offensive, which began with Operation Michael in March 1918, had culminated by the Second Battle of the Marne in mid-July 1918....  
Lieutenant-General Sir Stanley ‘Joe’ Maude was one of the First World War’s most successful fighting Generals....  
When Adolf Hitler went to war in 1914, aged 25, he lived through what he would later call the “most stupendous experience of my life”....  
Don Bradman could cut you with his tongue as sharply as he could flash a ball to the boundary with his bat....  
At the beginning of 1918, three years of fighting and destruction had failed to produce any clear result on the Western Front....  
When originally formed in 1914 the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) was commanded by Major-General William Bridges, who also commanded the 1st Division....  
Ottoman authorities arrested and deported 230 Armenian political, religious, educational and intellectual leaders in Constantinople 500km east to Angora (now Ankara) on the eve of the ANZAC landing on Gallipoli....  
David Cameron has produced a monumentally detailed and documented account of the battles fought by Australian troops between the 21st March and 25th April 1918....  
This short book is the product of Pat Beale’s interest in the Australian Imperial Force’s (AIF’s) performance in the First World War in Europe....  
Most Australian Army unit histories are based on units: infantry battalion, artillery regiments, engineer squadrons and the like....  
Jay Winter is Charles J Stille Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University....  
General Erich Ludendorff was one of the most important military individuals of the last century, yet today, he is one of the least known....  
In Australians on the Western Front 1918 Volume 1, the first in a two-part series, David Cameron tells the extraordinary story of Australian troops on the Western Front in March and April of 1918....  
There have been a number of publications on the various First World War Middle Eastern campaigns, but Johnson has, in examining the period from 1907 to 1923, brought every element involved in the Middle East during this period into a comprehensive and fascinating work....  
These two companion volumes come from the Army History Unit (AHU) and continue its important tradition of producing well-researched works on key Australian battles....  
As the centenary of the Great War has been observed, there has been considerable writing outside the realm of sacrifice, heroism and bravery emerging to redress the existing imbalance....  
The Pompey Elliott Memorial Hall was filled to capacity on Wednesday October 25 2017 as Professor Perry addressed a rapt audience of 80....  
Secret Army tells the story of ‘Dunsterforce’ – an Allied military force raised in late 1917 and named after its commander, General Lionel Dunsterville....  
Thoughts of the First World War typically conjure images of deep muddy trenches, barbed wire and craters; yet during the summer of 1918 after the German Spring offensive had culminated, battles were fought on rolling farmlands....  
By following these 7 simple steps you can research every Australian First World War Soldier....  
As Patron of MHHV it is my privilege to offer my thoughts on what I considered was an excellent conference....  
Schemes for settling returned soldiers on the land were introduce Soldier Settlement in Australia starting in 1916 to provide employment for discharged men now returning from overseas, and for the expected tens of thousands more expected....  
During the latter part of the First World War, the raids that Australians made against the Germans on the Western Front were described in the Official History as ‘peaceful penetration’....  
In Their Time of Need documents this century-long commitment, focusing on the overseas deployment of defence and other personnel and equipment for broadly humanitarian goals, generally in response to a call for assistance after a natural disaster or other non-conflict related emergency....  
Major General Harry Chauvel served in the Boer War before being appointed commander of the 1st Australian Light Horse Brigade (1st ALH) to lead his dismounted troops on Gallipoli....  
The following is the introduction given by Kevin Peoples at the launch of his book on his Uncle Jack....  
Paul Moorcroft is a writer with four decades of experience in the subject matter covered in Dying for the Truth....  
It was entirely appropriate that the AE&MM&BC should be commonly known as the ‘Alphabet’ Company in the Great War rather than the Australian Electrical and Mechanical Mining and Boring Company....  
Dr. Westerman is currently a researcher and adjunct lecturer at UNSW Canberra....  
It may surprise many of us to know that an analysis of the DNA of the bodies recovered from the Battle of Fromelles revealed that many of the predominantly Australian soldiers had identifiable Askanazi Jewish haplotypes....  
It is now almost a year since my book The High Life of Oswald Watt was published....  
This substantial and impressive volume describes the service life of William George Monteith – the author’s late husband’s grandfather....  
Here is yet another volume in the series of Australian Army campaigns – the seventeenth. It follows last year’s A Greater Sum of Sorrow: the Battles of Bullecourt by the same author....  
Training for War examines the history of Headquarters 1st Division. The 1st Division was first formed in 1914 for service during World War I as a part of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF)....  
One hundred and eighty three men served as the commanding officers (COs) of the 60 infantry battalions in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF)....  
When the First World War ended on 11 November 1918 Allied military authorities were keen to ensure that the millions of soldiers awaiting repatriation and demobilisation across Europe were appropriately occupied and that the reputation of the force not be undermined by ill-disciplined behaviour....  
This first biography was written by his grandson, Basil (Jika) Holmes Travers after his retirement in 1984, and was finally published in 2016 through the efforts of his daughter Philippa Holmes Hyles....  
The Battle of Beersheba took place on 31 October 1917 as part of the wider British offensive collectively known as the Third Battle of Gaza....  
By the end of the First World War, the combat formations of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in both France and the Middle East were considered among the British Empire’s most effective troops. How the force came to be so was not due to any inherent national prowess or trait....  
Jeff Maynard has done Australia a great service by researching and writing this incredible biography of George Hubert Wilkins....  
Michael White produced the first edition of his work back in 1992....  
There are many books about the Light Horse campaigns in WW1, but this one has the advantage of including illustrations on almost every page, many of them being rarely-seen photographs from private collections....  
In early 1918 Germany was severely affected by the Allied naval blockade, the American Expeditionary Force became stronger by the month and the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires were visibly crumbling....  
The one day conference held on 12 November 2016 brought together a fascinating series of presenters and as with all MHHV conferences revealed some information gems....  
Fully Revised and Expanded Edition of the Bestseller....  
The extent of Australia’s casualties in the First World War is, I consider, grossly underestimated....  
Edward Keenan, born in Workington, Cumberland in 1884 and an iron ore miner by trade, was one of a family of nine sons and four daughters, seven sons of which at one point in 1899 were all serving in the British Army....  
Watt only became a pilot in 1911 and died after an unfortunate accident in 1921....  
As military historians are now writing on specific 20th century campaigns, they have the time and space to explore every facet of what was involved....  
Our RUSI library has a superb collection of items relating to the Battle of Fromelles. Recent events have brought it into prominence – many Australians are now well aware that on the 19th and 20th of July 1916 the 5th Australian Division sustained 5533 casualties in a battle that achieved none of its goals. Our...  
Passchendaele epitomises everything that was most terrible about the Western Front: “pointless butchery that, even by the standards of the Great War entered the realm of the infernal and monumentally futile”. Soldiers, animals, artillery and pouring, unrelenting rain were “thrown together in a maelstrom of steel and flesh in the name of a strategy that...  
The first thing a soldier generally learns, on the very first day of enlistment, is his or her personal number....  
Several years ago, if you wanted the detailed story of any of Australia’s major battles on the Western Front in the First World War, the Official History was your only option....  
Renfrew, a noted military historian and war reporter, has written a masterly history of a sparsely recorded period of the Royal Air Force between the First and Second World Wars....  
Arriving in Amiens on a late Sunday afternoon is an unexpected experience....  
The ‘Fair Dinkums’ were those who, once the initial rush to enlist was over, and the scale of casualties at Gallipoli had become apparent, joined the army from a considered sense of duty and patriotism....  
If George Martindale were writing today he would possibly be described as ‘a wordsmith’!...  
Phillip Schuler, a handsome young journalist from the Melbourne Age, covered the Gallipoli campaign alongside Charles Bean....  
This book is an exploration of the nature of journalism, politics and history that utilises Charles Bean’s life as the vehicle....  
Launch of Australia’s Field Marshal – The Leadership of Sir Thomas Blamey – Shrine of Remembrance 26 July 2016- By Emeritus Professor David Horner...  
An international conference War Wounds: Medicine of Trauma and Conflict was conceived by Ashley Atkins and with his colleague Elizabeth Stewart developed the program that was convened by the Australian War Memorial in September 2009 with the support of the Department of Veteran Affairs....  
Volume 4 of The Centenary History of Australia and the Great War series. ...  
These are volumes two and three of the Oxford Centenary History of the Great War, and we are most grateful to the publisher for the review copies....  
For John Charlton, eldest son of Walter and Mary Charlton of Castle Creek, a small settlement near Euroa in central Victoria, deployment to the South African Boer War couldn’t come quick enough.   Although volunteering early in the conflict, a serious leg injury prevented him from being sent overseas until 1901 where he served with the...  
The Battle of Fromelles is the worst 24 hours in Australian history claimed historian Dr Ross McMullin....  
J. C. Barrie was a militia officer who went to war as a Lieutenant with the AIF’s 8th Infantry Battalion and served later with 15 Bde....  
Popular Australian history of the First World War is primarily about the Army at Gallipoli and then on the Western Front. The RAN is seldom mentioned apart from Sydney’s defeat of Emden and the occupation of the German Pacific Colonies....  
This is a valuable collection of chapters written by established and emerging authors seeking to present a range of material on complex issues arising from the Great War....  
On 11th May 2016 Kate Luciano was MHHV’s monthly Military History Speaker. In it she summarised the post WW1 Victorian Soldier Settlement Scheme helped settle some 11,639 out of the 78,000 returned soldiers on farming land across the state through government leases between 1918 and 1934....  
Jeff Maynard is an author, documentary maker, broadcaster, editor and book reviewer from Melbourne....  
Soldier Boys examines the development of the military in Australasia from the first volunteer militia units in 1860, voluntary cadet units prior to 1909 (1910 in New Zealand) through to the end of compulsory cadet training in 1929....  
Tread softly through the night of gloom,...  
Kismet is an account of the experiences of 67 Australian soldiers captured by the Ottoman forces at Anzac during the Gallipoli campaign....  
The First World War was a truly global conflict....  
The inter war period (1919-1939) is often considered a time when the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) was least active due to financial and personnel constraints. ...  
The Western Front: an Australian perspective is a beautifully presented and well researched large format (coffee table) book that provides an evocative multi-dimensional perspective; and is probably the next best thing to physically visiting the Western Front....  
William Thornton Watson was born on 10 November 1887 at Nelson, New Zealand, son of Tasmanian-born Robert Watson, blacksmith, and his Victorian wife Annie, née Harford....  
Harold Edward (Pompey) Elliott (1878-1931), soldier, lawyer and politician, was born on 19th June 1878 at West Charlton, Victoria, son of Thomas Elliott, farmer, and his wife Helen, née Janvrin....  
Grantlee Kieza’s biography of John Monash comes on the heels of Roland Perry’s 2014 biography and Tim Fisher’s 2014 quasi-biography....  
The presentation commenced at 6.30pm, after welcome drinks and finger food....  
Australian Victories in France in 1918 is the original Monash book written by the great man in 1920....  
After three long months of stalemate on the Gallipoli peninsula thousands had died in fighting and many more had been wounded....  
The Ottoman Defence against the Anzac Landing: 25 April 1915 places us one step closer towards better understanding the events of this fateful day....  
Bookshops have seen no shortage of new products with the word ‘Gallipoli’ in their titles over the past few months, so my challenge here is to explain what makes Gallipoli a little different....  
Maestro John Monash is not so much a biography or military history book as a long essay making the argument to posthumously promote Sir John Monash to the rank of Field Marshal....  
It will come as no surprise that this book lays responsibility for the Dardanelles campaign of 1915 at Winston Churchill’s feet....  
Book Review – Bearing Witness is a remarkably insightful and informative biography of C. E. W. (Charles Edwin Woodrow) Bean – arguably Australia’s most famous war correspondent and war historian....  
The battle of Chunuk Bair, Gallipoli, was part of a combined assault to take the Sari Bair Range....  
The War with the Ottoman Empire is the second volume in The Centenary History of Australia and the Great War series....  
While more than forty Australian civilian nurses had served officially in the Boer War (1899 -1902) in South Africa, the outbreak of World War I on 4 August 1914 brought an immediate response from trained nurses keen to serve professionally as military nurses....  
Service number 2124. One of the few Australian prisoners taken during the 1915 Gallipoli Campaign....  
This Article is part 2 of an excerpt from Chapter 7, ‘The Great War’ in Kilsby, A.J., The Riflemen, A History of the National Rifle Association of Australia 1888-1988, (Longueville Media, 2013)....  
In All Respects Ready: Australia’s Navy in World War One by David Stevens....  
Shortly after midday the gunners at Fort Nepean lined up the German merchant steamer – the SS Pfalz – as it bolted towards the heads and fired the first shot in a terrible war that would last four long years and scar the world....  
At the outbreak of WWI in August 1914, the Australian Fleet and the Australian Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) were tasked to remove the German presence from the Pacific....  
The loss of AE1 with her entire complement of 3 officers and 32 sailors was the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN’s) first major tragedy and it marred an otherwise successful operation to seize the German possession in New Guinea in the opening weeks of WWI. It is not known what caused AE1 to disappear without trace....  
Philip Bradley has done two useful things in this book; he has taken extracts from Charles Bean’s diary from Gallipoli and combined it with dozens of never before seen photographs taken by soldiers....  
No tour of the battlefields of the two World Wars can omit a visit to at least one Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) cemetery....  
Reginald Langdon Buller, Civil Servant, Naval Officer and Vigneron was born in Geelong, Victoria on 30 May 1894 the only son of Frederick Thomas Buller (Civil Servant) and Mary Graham Buller (nee Anderson)....  
Victoria at War 1914-1918 By Michael McKernan is another coffee table book on the First World War....  
The RUSI of Victoria Library has been given a valuable letter written by the officer who led the charge of the Light Horse at Beersheba in the First World War....  
Survived the Boer War, killed in action at Gallipoli on the 25th April 1915....  
Many museums have an item or two in their collection that almost every other similar museum keeps. It could be a helmet, a rifle, a tunic, a book or any one of possibly thousands of different artifacts. These items are often put away in a safe place and forgotten. They are very usually of little...  
The story of Australia’s part in the Gallipoli Campaign has become a central part of our national story and identity. On the eve of the campaign’s centenary it is a story that runs the risk of becoming more mythical in nature. Thank goodness, then, for Climax at Gallipoli which might put some objective balance back...  
Commemorate your branch or association’s ”story” for the Anzac Centenary with a high quality, fully customised book or brochure at an affordable price....  
On the eve of the Anzac Centenary this book and the project to create it deserves high praise....  
by James Brown, Red Back, 2014; 160 pp.; ISBN 9781863956390 (softcover); RRP $19.99...  
A recent ABC radio interview with Keith Quinton, the author of a recently published book ‘Stop the Pfalz – 1914’, and the chairperson of the Victorian Anzac Centenary Committee, Ted Baillieu, has generated considerable interest in the opening hours of WW1....  
John Wesley (Jack) Mitchell (1891-1969), army officer and public servant, was born on 16 March 1891 at Tarranyurk, near Dimboola,...  
There are many cases of brothers enlisting in the First AIF and in some cases serving together, but it is very unusual to find a brother and sister enlisting and to be then serving in the same theatre. Martin and Patricia Blundell did just this. They both served in Gallipoli in late 1915 – Martin...  
On 26 March 1913, HMAS Melbourne, Australia’s first light armoured, ‘Chatham Class’, cruiser, commissioned at Birkenhead on 18 January 1913, lay alongside Port Melbourne’s Town Pier, on completion of her maiden voyage....  
William Dunstan was born in Ballarat East, Victoria. His father, William John Dunstan, a boot maker and his mother, Henrietta (nee’ Mitchell) welcomed their third son on March 8, 1895....  
The year 2007 saw the 75th Anniversary of the opening of the Great Ocean Road, and marked with many celebrations as befitted this iconic road running along the coast of Victoria west of Geelong....  
The Great War saw the emergence of an Australian Flying Corps (AFC), which by 1918 was making a tangible contribution to Allied air operations in the Middle East and on the Western Front. Over the operational phases of the war, the airmen and ground crews adapted to new aircraft types while facing a determined enemy...  
James Ernest Newland was born in the Geelong suburb of Highton, Victoria, on 22nd August 1881, the son of labourer and railway worker William Newland and his wife Louisa Jane (née Wall)....  
Andrew Kilsby and Greg Swinden, Longueville Media, Woollahra, NSW, 2013. On 26 March 1913, HMAS Melbourne, Australia’s first light armoured, ‘Chatham Class’, cruiser, commissioned at Birkenhead on 18 January 1913, lay alongside Port Melbourne’s Town Pier, on completion of her maiden voyage. On 4 October 1913, Melbourne, along with Australia, Sydney, and the other modern...  
Captain Robert Alexander (Alec) Little, our greatest fighter ace, has fallen off our radar of almost all Australians. Today it is usually only WWI aviation enthusiasts and students at Scotch College, Melbourne, his old school, who recall the remarkable record of the young Melbourne pilot who claimed 47 victories and won a chestful of medals...  
In January 1917, Private Ernest Capuano, a driver with 22 AASC who has been trying to transfer to munitions work, was reporting in letters home that his unit was scheduled to go to France. ...  
Ernest William Capuano, the fifth child of Victorian-born parents, was born 31 March 1892 and grew up in the Gippsland district of Victoria.  A sentinel feature of the lives of his parents Harry and Annie Capuano was their participation as active members of the Plymouth Brethren.  Although Ernest did not become a member of this...  
The Underbelly – Razor series deals with the Criminal underworld of Sydney during the 1920’s and 1930’s.  Bengal ‘cut throat’ blade razors were the preferred weapon of many of the thugs and standover men who belonged to the many Razor Gangs that operated throughout the city.    Amongst these many petty criminals, thieves and enforcers was...  
In the far north of Western Australia lies perhaps Australia’s most isolated war grave.   In the now overgrown and forgotten Drysdale River Mission Station cemetery at Pago, Western Australia lies the remains of Warrant Officer (Gunner) John Henry Davies who had the misfortune to be killed by a crocodile while serving in the survey vessel...  
In Part I of the Treacy story, the author traced Treacy’s career in the Victorian Navy between 1894 to 1901, the Commonwealth Naval Forces between 1901 and 1911 and his years in the RAN until 1914.  Part II continues the story of Treacy’s career to his retirement in 1922, and beyond....  
In the 1920s, when the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) came into being, the concept of the Australian government’s national defence was based predominantly on a maritime strategy led by Navy....  
‘Are you sure you’ve got the right number?  It seems a remarkably low one to me.’ ‘He always claimed to be Number 3 of the Australian Army’, was my reply. I was talking to someone at Veterans Affairs in Canberra about my father’s entitlement to the award of the Anzac Commemorative Medallion which was instituted...  
Accounts of the period when command arrangements for the Royal Australian Air Force were decided prior to its formation, on 31 March 1921, have usually focused on the competing claims of two local officers: Lieutenant Colonel Richard Williams, formerly of the Australian Flying Corps (AFC) during World War I, and Wing Commander S.J. (‘Jim’) Goble, an...  
We have a reasonably good idea who the first men to land on the Gallipoli Peninsula on the 25th April 1915 were. They were Queenslanders, part of the 9th Battalion, in one of the landing craft that came ashore in the predawn darkness at 4.21am.  Who the first Queenslander to step foot ashore is not...  
On its formation on 31 March 1921, the RAAF was the second independent air force in the world—after the Royal Air Force (RAF). But another distinct “air force” flew aircraft, set records and carried out government tasks in Australia well before this date. How did this force come about and what happened to it?...  
George Pinnock Merz was born at Prahran on 10 October 1891. A graduate (1914) in Medicine at the University of Melbourne, he was commissioned (1913) second  lieutenant in the Melbourne University Rifles and was one of three Militia officers of the first four officers (including the future Air Marshal Richard Williams) to be selected for...  
During research for ‘An Industrial Invasion’, I came across the story of about 6000 Australian civilian men who volunteered to go and work in British factories during WWI an effort Winston Churchill called ‘An Industrial Invasion’, a phrase I used as the title of the book on that subject....  
Surely you remember the television series The Sullivans? If you do you may not realize that the name was based on two real life characters. A close look at Dave Sullivan and his great mate, Jack, the barman, when they were kitted out for the Anzac Day march in their old uniforms would have revealed...  
The aftermath of the Turkish attack on the 3rd Light Horse Brigade positions at Russell’s Top, Gallipoli, 29th -30th June 1915. The Turkish assault on the 3rd LH Brigade positions on Russell’s Top, 29th – 30th June would be the last major attack undertaken by the Turkish forces at ANZAC, or as known to the...  
Odds are that you have heard of Simpson and his donkey. And maybe you know that pigeons were used extensively to transport messages in World War I....  
Of course the use of poison gas in warfare had been proscribed under the Hague Convention of 1905, and Germany as well as all the other WW1 combatants had signed it.  The relevant article read: ‘The contracting powers agree to abstain from the use of projectiles;/ /the object of which is the diffusion of asphyxiating...  
To answer this question, information has been drawn from the writings of C. E. W. Bean, Tony Sillcock, a national serviceman who ended up becoming the Music Director (Lt.Col.) of the Australian Army Band Corps, and Bob Keatch, ex-president of Australian Army Band Corps Association....  
The story of HM Australian Submarine AE2 in the Dardanelles campaign typically ends on April 30, 1915 when the stricken submarine, after penetrating the Narrows and ‘running amok’ against the Turkish warships was severely damaged and forced to surface. The valiant crew abandoned ship before scuttling it in the Sea of Marmara. The vessel itself...  
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