World War Two to 1962
This monumental reference work is a labour of love carried out by the author over 35 years....  
HMAS Australia, and her sister ship Canberra, were County Class heavy cruisers (with 8-inch guns) built in England for the Royal Australian Navy....  
There are numerous soldiers’ descendants who have recounted their fathers’ incarceration in Europe or Asia during the Second World War, but it is a rare experience to read the autobiography of an Australian prisoner of war....  
This expensive and voluminous book is a fitting addition to our collection of texts relating to Military Law, an important segment of any comprehensive military library....  
A recent visit to this charming island showed just how obsessed Hitler was with it and how breathtakingly illogical his obsession was....  
For many, the 1977 movie A Bridge Too Far is the main point of reference for Operation Market Garden....  
At the end of World War II, faced with widespread destruction in Europe, strong communist parties in Greece and France, and the Red Army deployed throughout Eastern Europe and in the eastern zone of Germany, United States Army chief-of-staff, General George C. Marshall Jr., was concerned that, without American aid, key allies would not be...  
Savage Continent is a deeply harrowing account of Europe as a continent reeling from the impacts and consequences of World War II....  
in the histories of the Occupation. Subtitled ‘An extraordinary story of resistance and rescue in Nazi Paris’ this is the result of her search for Suzanne’s story....  
What was the purpose of the book? John Curtin’s War is an examination of events about ‘an obscure politician from Perth’ (p. 321) who had left school at fourteen, was good at arithmetic, smoked Craven ‘As’, liked Irish stew, could type with two fingers, went on picnics and became Prime Minister in most extra-ordinary, difficult...  
Most Australian Army unit histories are based on units: infantry battalion, artillery regiments, engineer squadrons and the like....  
Jay Winter is Charles J Stille Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University....  
This book is a collection of stories from the Second World War that centre around the themes of war crimes and acts of moral ambiguity....  
A Bit on the Side breaks new ground in this little known and understood aspect of Australia’s society during World War II....  
Michael Veitch is an accomplished author who has written an absorbing account about one Australian’s experiences in wartime....  
Most naval histories of World War II say little about the Baltic, so this comprehensive book by Poul Grooss, published in Denmark in 2014 and translated into English in 2017, is a welcome and overdue reminder of its importance....  
This is the story of people from many diverse backgrounds coming together in Melbourne and Queensland during the Pacific War from 1941 to 1945....  
Maynard has gone to great lengths to ensure he has written a well-balanced account of the exploits of the 8th Division and its commander from 1941 until 15th February 2017 when the Australian Ex-Prisoners of War Memorial was unveiled in Ballarat....  
In Their Time of Need documents this century-long commitment, focusing on the overseas deployment of defence and other personnel and equipment for broadly humanitarian goals, generally in response to a call for assistance after a natural disaster or other non-conflict related emergency....  
Ted was born at Rushworth, Victoria on 26 August 1922. He was living with his family in Prahran and working as a French Polisher when war broke out in Europe and the Middle East....  
Paul Moorcroft is a writer with four decades of experience in the subject matter covered in Dying for the Truth....  
Bryn Evans is an Australian author and management consultant that writes extensively across a wide range of categories, including military history, travel, and business management....  
It may surprise many of us to know that an analysis of the DNA of the bodies recovered from the Battle of Fromelles revealed that many of the predominantly Australian soldiers had identifiable Askanazi Jewish haplotypes....  
Battle Winners explores the rise of artillery to become arguably a decisive combat arm in the battles waged by the allies against the Italian Army and the Afrika Korps in the deserts of North Africa from 1940 to 1942....  
After re-reading earlier this year Rohan Rivett’s 1946 edition of ‘Behind Bamboo’ with his vivid account of his own escape from Singapore, his recapture in Java and his three years as a POW in Burma, I was really looking forward to the publication of Roger Maynard’s new book on General Gordon Bennett....  
Training for War examines the history of Headquarters 1st Division. The 1st Division was first formed in 1914 for service during World War I as a part of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF)....  
The southern half of eastern New Guinea (the Territory of Papua) came under Australian administration in 1902, following annexation by the United Kingdom....  
This week commemorates the end of the Second World War in Europe, seventy-two years ago, when after six long years, the Allies were victorious....  
Despite the fame of Britain’s Bletchley Park for code cracking there were many unsung installations around the world that carried out important signals intelligence work with spectacular results....  
“ The German officer pulled out his Luger and shot Norm  right between the eyes. These are the stories that will never be told” said  the 93 year old World War 2 veteran fighting back tears. Yet, the Pancretan Association of Melbourne – Australia  has embarked on a journey to gather material on Australian servicemen...  
Michael White produced the first edition of his work back in 1992....  
After more than 20 year’s Army service as a Military Police investigator, in retirement Johnston discovered a military event totally unknown to him. On Monday 21st of May 1945, a single explosion in an underground training bunker at the Royal Australian Engineer Training Centre at ‘Kapooka Camp’, nine miles from Wagga Wagga killed 26 of...  
The one day conference held on 12 November 2016 brought together a fascinating series of presenters and as with all MHHV conferences revealed some information gems....  
Dick Braithwaite was one of the six survivors of the Sandakan death marches of 1945. He died in 1986, and his son Richard Wallace Braithwaite, after a 40-year tirelessly researched project, now tells the story....  
Mr Gordon served for nearly 40 years in the Australian Army and has a family connection with 455 Squadron RAAF, in that his father served as a Beaufighter navigator in the squadron....  
Those who have lived and worked at Fort Queenscliff or in the locality will find this a most interesting book. Even the general reader will still find it a rattling good murder mystery, complete with swirling theories of wartime black market criminality, signs of possible Japanese penetration, and suspicion of a botched Australian commando exercise,...  
The first thing a soldier generally learns, on the very first day of enlistment, is his or her personal number....  
This is an updated reprint of two earlier volumes by Anne Howard....  
John McMahon has written of the life of his aunt Monica McMahon with the greatest admiration for her and all the nursing and medical professionals she worked with during her long and productive career....  
Churchill’s Legacy describes how Winston Churchill wielded his influence in post-war politics to enable the restoration and defence of Europe through two key speeches in 1946....  
Launch of Australia’s Field Marshal – The Leadership of Sir Thomas Blamey – Shrine of Remembrance 26 July 2016- By Emeritus Professor David Horner...  
An international conference War Wounds: Medicine of Trauma and Conflict was conceived by Ashley Atkins and with his colleague Elizabeth Stewart developed the program that was convened by the Australian War Memorial in September 2009 with the support of the Department of Veteran Affairs....  
Originally written as an oral history of the events of the Greek (and Cretan) Campaign fought in 1941, this revised edition provides an essential military and political narrative of the largely overlooked Greek and Cretan Campaigns of World War II: twin campaigns that involved the reunited ANZACs fighting side by side for the first time...  
In early 1942 the Japanese set their sights on capturing Papua and New Guinea....  
This is the first of three books edited by Peter Dean that examine Australia and its situation from 1942 to 1945....  
The cover image of Stone Cold suggests that this is a story about an Australian soldier who fought in South Vietnam, but Len Opie carved a reputation as one of the country’s fiercest infantrymen through three wars across 30 years....  
Research staff at the Australian War Memorial recently found a file marked ‘8 Div. Papers’....  
On 14 April 2016 Dr Mark Johnston was MHHV’s monthly Military History Speaker....  
Of an estimated 2.3 million prisoners who entered the hell of the Nazi concentration camps, over 1.7 million were killed, whether gassed or worked to their skeletal ends. Many went straight to their deaths, including about 870,000 Jews murdered on arrival and without registration at Auschwitz; others endured a slower annihilation, reduced to what Hannah...  
This is the third and final volume of works edited by Peter Dean concerned with the Australian contribution to the war in the South-West Pacific....  
Plans, Command Problems and Controversy....  
William Thornton Watson was born on 10 November 1887 at Nelson, New Zealand, son of Tasmanian-born Robert Watson, blacksmith, and his Victorian wife Annie, née Harford....  
Largely overlooked for the more dramatic battles of 1941 (Greece, Crete, Syria, Tobruk) and 1942 (El Alamein, Papua New Guinea) the battles in New Guinea in 1943 are a portrait of Australia right at the absolute apex of its military prowess under the strong, capable stewardship of General Sir Thomas Blamey....  
Born and educated in Melbourne, Godfrey Blunden was a journalist working for the Sydney Daily Telegraph when in 1940, at the age of 34, he was sent to Europe to cover the war for Australian Consolidated Press....  
The close bonds of friendship and cooperation between the United States Marine Corps (USMC) and the Australian Army were forged in the Pacific campaigns of World War 2 and continue to the battlefields of today....  
Rear Admiral Sir Brian Stewart Murray was born at Glen Huntly, VIC on 26 December 1921 and was educated at Hampton High School, Melbourne. ...  
Mac Gregory was born in Geelong on 9 February 1922. His father was a member of the RAN based at Osborne House in Geelong and working with the J-Class Submarines....  
Reginald Langdon Buller, Civil Servant, Naval Officer and Vigneron was born in Geelong, Victoria on 30 May 1894 the only son of Frederick Thomas Buller (Civil Servant) and Mary Graham Buller (nee Anderson)....  
A review of Graeme Sligo’s book “The Backroom Boys – Alfred Conlon and Army’s Directorate of Research and Civil Affairs, 1942-46”...  
There has existed for many years a persistent myth that the first air attack on Darwin, on 19 February 1942, has been concealed by the federal government, a tale perpetuated even in modern times....  
John Wesley (Jack) Mitchell (1891-1969), army officer and public servant, was born on 16 March 1891 at Tarranyurk, near Dimboola,...  
Since the last AWM conference on the subject in 2003, much new material has been revealed about Australia’s air war in Europe....  
Named after the Victorian inland city of Ballarat. HMAS Ballarat I was one of sixty Australian Minesweepers (commonly known as corvettes) built during World War II in Australian shipyards as part of the Commonwealth Government’s wartime shipbuilding programme. Twenty (including Ballarat (I)) were built on Admiralty order but manned and commissioned by the Royal Australian...  
In 1942 Australia lay in the shadow of war, a shadow on its very doorstep. The victorious Japanese forces had swept right up to Australian territory and the very lifeline of the Pacific supply route with the United States was directly threatened....  
In reviewing this book I must declare “my conflict of interest” as the author is a personal friend and I had the pleasure of launching this riveting narrative of Australia’s most critical period in its history....  
Ronald ‘Buck’ Taylor was born in the Melbourne suburb of Carlton on 29 April 1918, the fourth of ten children (six boys and four girls) born to Elsie Taylor (Nee Davey) and George Taylor an Iron Worker from Collingwood.  As a child he lived in the suburb of Carlton until his family moved to Port...  
With the tattered fragments of the white ensign still flying, the YARRA slid beneath the waves at 8 am. Rankin’s defiant gesture, which cost the lives of 117 of the ships personnel, did not save the other vessels in the Allied convoy; all three were sunk even before YARRA met its end.  Another 21 of...  
DSC for gallantry and resolution whilst serving in HMAS PERTH lost by enemy action in the Far East on 1st March 1942.- (DSC, London Gazette 19 March 1946, presented by Governor General at Admiralty House Sydney 25 January 1949)....  
It happened in ‘Monterey’ a long time ago – 70 years ago this October to be precise, in a block of apartments on Melbourne’s Queens Road. ‘Monterey’ had been requisitioned by the Australian Department of Defence to provide space for two signals intelligence organisations, one the Australian Special Intelligence Bureau headed by an Australian naval...  
Shortly before 1000h on 19 February 1942, 188 Japanese carrier aircraft arrived over the port city of Darwin and began attacking naval and civil shipping, harbour facilities and the city itself. While RAAF Station Darwin was also attacked during this raid, it was clearly not the focus of the bombing, with the waterside area taking...  
Sitting high on a hill in New South Wales is Saint Ignatius’ College, better known as ‘Riverview’, because of its prime position overlooking the Lane Cove River....  
In relating and explaining our naval history to Australians, one is faced with several problems. The first is that the average person knows next to nothing about it. Despite the language spoken by most of us, our forms of government our legal system and even the side of the road we drive on being directly...  
Introduction. When Japan made her sneak attack on Pearl Harbor on Sunday December 7th. 1941, not only did she precipitate the United States into WW2, but they probably decided their own fate in the war they had started in the Pacific....  
Monte Cassino was the cornerstone of the German defensive system known as the Gustav Line and, while it remained intact, it prevented any further advance on Rome from the south by the US 5th and British 8th Armies. Not since 536 AD had any army ever succeeded in capturing Rome from the south....  
After four months of bitter fighting since invading the Italian mainland, by the end of 1943 the combined British and American armies hadn’t got much to show for it....  
Six days after Montgomery’s Eighth Army landed on the toe of Italy and began its ponderous advance north, troops of the Anglo American Fifth Army came ashore at Salerno...  
Not a lot has ever been written, or said, in Australia about the long and bitter campaign conducted against the Axis (mostly German) forces in Italy during the Second World War....  
It’s the geography that counts (among other things) The present conflict for the control of Libya seems to have reached a stalemate…...  
On the night of 27/28 April 1944, flying from the secret RAF Tempsford Airfield in England a Mark V-LL356 NFU Halifax bomber of No. 138 ‘Special Duties’ (SD) Squadron carrying its seven man crew, headed for its secret ‘Drop Zone’ (DZ) in German-occupied Belgium....  
Based on the premise of Hitler’s imminent defeat, the agenda of the Yalta Conference of February 1945 was basically about the partition of post-war Europe, but that same tide confirmed that there was little the Allies could do about the physical Soviet domination of Eastern Europe. The exact number of Soviet citizens and POW liberated...  
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